Manual & Training

Methods of Hair Removal

Depilation is the term applied to any method of removing hair. There are several different methods of doing this and all have varying degrees of success. There are two distinct groups; temporary and permanent removal.

Temporary Removal

Methods of temporary hair removal have progressed from shaving and tweezing to offer a variety of treatments with longer lasting results. Methods of hair removal include:

Shaving Tweezing

Widely used method of hair removed using a razor blade Hair is plucked from the area

Sugaring A sugar based paste is used for the removal of hair with results similar to waxing.
Threading  Originating in Asia this very simple yet skilled procedure is fast becoming part of the British beauty industry.
Depilatory Creams  Preparations that dissolve the hair at the skin surface. Results are similar to shaving.
Abrasive Mitts  A mitt is rubbed vigorously against skin surface until the abrasive action breaks the hair at the skin surface. Can cause in-growing hairs.
Epilators The epilating machines action rotates, catching hairs and pulling them out. This can be quite painful, can increase possibility of in-growing hairs and if used incorrectly hairs can break at the skin surface.
Waxing  The removal of superfluous hair growth has for many years been a requirement of modern day societies. Waxing has the longest lasting results of all the temporary methods.There are two forms of waxing: Hot Waxing and Warm Waxing (also known as Cool Waxing).
Hot Wax

Hot wax was the first method of waxing available to modern therapists

As the name suggests the wax can be used at a high temperature (68°F). It is

applied in a generous layer then allowed to start setting. This creates a wax

strip which is then removed against the hair growth. Hot wax is extremely

successful if used correctly. It is essential that the therapist completes intensive training to gain a full understanding of waxing and knowledge of usage, prior to carrying out waxing treatments to ensure client safety.

Warm (or Cool )Wax

Warm wax is by far the most popular product used today within the waxing industry. The wax is used at approximately 48°F. The wax adheres to the hairs and when it is removed pulls the hair shaft from underneath the skin, quite often with the root attached. This method is an extremely efficient way to deal with large areas of unwanted hair which cannot be economically treated by permanent methods.This quick treatment offers instant visible results.

Re-growth may appear 2-3 weeks after waxing depending on the individual.

However, as the hairs have been removed from the root the ends seem fine and tapered and are often patchy. Full re-growth takes 6-8 weeks.

The warmth of the wax helps open the pores, helping the removal of the hairs; which should be swift to avoid discomfort.

Waxing can be a popular and profitable salon treatment. It attracts client’s of all age groups and once the benefits of re-growth have been experienced it is a repeated service that client’s will return to regularly.

Re-growth on the lip or chin area will usually need treatment every 4-6 weeks.Whilst re-growth of the legs often requires treatment every 3-4 weeks.

Permanent methods of hair removal

Electrolysis

Electrolysis is the term applied to the chemical reaction that occurs within the hair follicle when a galvanic current is passed through the skin. It is a production of sodium hydroxide/lye within the hair follicle, which in turn dissolves the cells of the dermal papillae therefore destroying the growth from that follicle. Sodium hydroxide/lye is produced due to the chemical reaction that occurs between the salt and water that is found naturally in the hair follicle.

There are two types of electrolysis machine available today:

1. Invasive (needle treatment)

2. Non-invasive (needle free treatment that uses conductive gels to apply current to the follicle)

Laser Treatment

Laser is a very intensive treatment that destroys the hair follicle by the use of laser light over the area. Only highly qualified operators perform treatments as the risk of skin damage and potential scarring is high. It can be very effective for clients with severe problems when carried out correctly but it is very expensive and still cannot offer a complete guarantee of 100% success.

Contra-indications of Waxing

Blood and circulatory disorders - Blood and circulatory disorders, particularly those causing easy bruising (e.g., thrombosis) are  contra-indicated.

Cancer treatments - Chemotherapy and radiation may cause increased sensitivity. It would be productive to wait until 6 weeks after the last cancer treatment.

Epilepsy - Epilepsy is contra-indicated unless it has been controlled for a long period and with medication that does not cause easy bruising. A physician’s approval must be attained before the waxing service.The technician should receive a physician’s note and have the client sign a release.

Diabetes - The client with diabetes should consult with the physician for the degree of severity and the degree of healing and sign a release.

Fractures and sprains - The area of fracture or sprain should not be waxed until it is completely healed.

Haemophilia - Clients with haemophilia should not be waxed, because bleeding can occur, especially when removing a high percentage of anagen hairs.The removal of anagen hairs breaks the cycle of blood flow to the dermal papilla and causes bleeding in the follicle.

Herpes, herpes simplex (cold sore) - Clients with herpes should not be waxed during active outbreaks.Prophylactic medication should be taken before waxing.

Inflamed or irritated skin - Inflamed or irritated skin should not be waxed.

Lack of skin sensation - The lack of skin sensation can be due to circulatory problems arising from heart disease, diabetes, or multiple sclerosis.There can be an increased risk of burning, injury, or infection. These clients should not be waxed.

Lupus - Those with mild forms of lupus and not presenting with the rash on the areas to be waxed can be waxed, but it is not advisable. At the very least, these clients should seek referrals from physicians.

Moles, skin tags and warts - All moles, skin tags, and warts should be avoided. Any mole that looks suspicious; has any of the pre cancer signs of size, shape, and colour; or has hair growing out of it should not be waxed without the permission of a physician.

Pregnancy - There is nothing intrinsically wrong with waxing the bikini area or any other area on the pregnant client but a judgment should be made by both parties jointly and a release form should be signed. If the pregnant client is considered high risk, has high blood pressure or anxiety, it is better to avoid waxing. If the areas to be waxed take more than 20 minutes of the client lying flat on her back, then the client should wait until after the birth of the baby. Prolonged time flat on the back could deplete oxygen to the foetus.

Scar tissue - No scar tissue, including keloids, should be waxed over.

Sunburn - Sunburnt areas should not be waxed.Any such area must have healed completely.

Skin disorder conditions - Skin disorders like eczema, seborrhoea, and psoriasis may be waxed depending on severity. Minimal flakiness of dead skin cells can be waxed, but not if the skin is broken. In mild cases, the skin may benefit from the exfoliating properties of waxing, but in more advanced stages broken skin could result. A signed release from the client must be completed before waxing.

Varicose veins - Technicians must not wax over varicose veins but they may wax surrounding areas.

Sensitive areas - Never wax eyelids, inside the ears or nose, or the areole the breast.

Other client advice should include:

- The hair to be waxed should be a minimum of  inch long if it is virgin hair, meaning that it is previously untreated, or if it is fine re growth.

- Hair should be  inch long if shaven and coarse, which is approximately 10 to 14 days post shaving.

- If possible, the client should lift ingrown hairs 4 days to a week before the service, leaving the hair in the follicle, allowing the follicle to heal and normalise.

- Working the area of the body with an exfoliating mitt before waxing is recommended, but not on the day of the service, because it is too stimulating.

- Avoid tanning (sun or booths) for 24 hours before and 24 hours after the area has been waxed, or until any redness has completely subside.

Client Preparation & Hygiene

After Effects & home care Advice

* Where possible ask your client to remove the item of clothing that could inhibit the treatment

* Cover them with a modesty towel and expose only the area to treated

* Protect the edge of the modesty towel with couch roll or tissue

* When working as a mobile therapist please be aware of your clients home P.V.C couch covers can be used to protect expensive carpets and furniture

Hygiene

Always wash hands before starting any treatment

Always wash hands when moving from one area of the body to another

Use a new spatula every time you dip into the wax pot to avoid cross ontamination

Use fresh couch roll for each new client

Use clean towels for each new client

Always dispose of used paper/fabric strips

Always wear disposable gloves and change gloves for every client.

Glove Use

Disposable gloves should always be worn when waxing a client. Blood spots appear in areas that are waxed and it is especially important to wear gloves if there is broken skin on the technicians hand, even in the form of a hangnail. Gloves also let clients know that the technician follows Universal Precautions. A new pair of gloves should be worn with each client.They should be powder-free, vinyl or reduced-protein latex gloves. The client should be questioned for any allergy to latex. Clients who are allergic to latex wilI probably bring it to the technician’s attention when the technician puts on the gloves.

After Effects & home care Advice

The client should be advised that the skin might appear red with a pin prick reaction for several hours after treatment.This is perfectly normal and the client should be reassured.

The reason for the reaction is that when the hairs are pulled from the follicle this causes a trauma.The body's natural defence and repair system is stimulated bringing water and increased blood supply to the follicle to calm and heal.

This in turn produces slight swelling in each follicle causing redness and bumps.

The skin takes between 24-48 hours to settle down after waxing and it should be treated gently

during this time.The client should be given the following advice:

Client Preparation & Hygiene

After Effects & home care Advice

Where possible ask your client to remove the item of clothing that could inhibit the treatment Cover them with a modesty towel and expose only

the area to treated Protect the edge of the modesty towel with couch roll or tissue When working as a mobile therapist please be aware of your

clients home P.V.C couch covers can be used to protect expensive carpets and furniture Always wash hands before starting any treatment

Always wash hands when moving from one area of the body to another

Use a new spatula every time you dip into the wax pot to avoid cross contamination

Use fresh couch roll for each new client

Use clean towels for each new client

Always dispose of used paper/fabric strips

Always wear disposable gloves and change gloves for every client.

The skin may be sensitive to heat, so only lukewarm baths or showers should be taken

Perfumed products should not be used over the area

A soothing afterwax treatment should be used - i.e Hive Cool Down - see back pages.

Tight clothing should be avoided.

No sunbeds or sunbathing for at least 24 hours.

Make up should be avoided over the area for 24 hours

No swimming for 24 hours.

No heat or electrical treatments in the salon for 24 hours.

Do not apply deodorant or anti-perspirant after an under arm wax for 24 hours.

Do not sit in front of hot fires.

When the client has understood his/her home care advice, then her record card

should be filled in and signed.

Safety Precautions

- Regular supervision should be given to the wax, to check its progress, (even thermostatically controlled units)

- Protect client and working area adequately

- Testing the wax heat temperature in connection with the clients tolerance

- Be careful - careless application produces unsatisfactory results

- Move the wax carefully whilst hot

- Apply and remove wax in correct manner.

- Direction as determined by the type of wax employed.

- Avoid overlapping to prevent scalding.

- Following hygiene precautions to reduce the risk of infection.

General Equipment Safety

- Do not operate the wax heater if it has a damaged cord or plug, or if it has been dropped into water or if it is disfunctioning.

- Keep the cord away from heated surfaces.

- Do not use equipment outdoors or where aerosol sprays are being used.

- Connect the appliance to a properly grounded outlet only.

- Do not wrap the cord around the wax unit or bend or twist it.

- In the event of any malfunction the wax unit should be returned to the place it was purchased.

- Always ground wax heaters. In the event of an electrical short circuit, grounding reduce the risk of electric shock by providing a path of low resistance for the electric current.

- The plugs on grounded equipment must be plugged into outlets that are properly installed and grounded in compliance with all local codes and ordinances.

Copyright:© 2009 Anesi Cosmetics Co.,Ltd. Website :www.anesibeauty.com Contact Us:market@anesibeauty.com
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